Publicaciones


30/07/2014

BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS FROM APLASTIC ANEMIA PATIENTS PRESERVE FUNCTIONAL AND IMMUNE PROPERTIES AND DO NOT CONTRIBUTE TO THE PATHOGENESIS O

Aplastic anemia is a life-threatening bone marrow failure disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The majority of cases of aplastic anemia remain idiopathic, although hematopoietic stem cell deficiency and impaired immune responses are hallmarks underlying the bone marrow failure in this condition. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells constitute an essential component of the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment because of their immunomodulatory properties and their ability to support hematopoiesis, and they have been involved in the pathogenesis of several hematologic malignancies. We investigated whether bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells contribute, directly or indirectly, to the pathogenesis of aplastic anemia. We found that mesenchymal stem cell cultures can be established from the bone marrow of aplastic anemia patients and display the same phenotype and differentiation potential as their counterparts from normal bone marrow. Mesenchymal stem cells from aplastic anemia patients support the in vitro homeostasis and the in vivo repopulating function of CD34(+) cells, and maintain their immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. These data demonstrate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from patients with aplastic anemia do not have impaired functional and immunological properties, suggesting that they do not contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.